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GIVE EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK

As a manager, giving effective and regular feedback will create thriving and productive workers and connected teams.

A male and female manufacturing workers looking at tablet together
Feedback - both positive and negative - is essential to building productive workplace relationships.

Giving feedback shows workers that they are important. It is also essential to their professional development by helping them understand what is expected of them and how they are performing.


Feedback should happen on a regular basis – as part of your one-on-one check-ins – not just when performance reviews come around or if there is a problem.

Give effective feedback to your workm8tes regularly by following these tips:

1. Make it timely


The closer to the event you address the issue, the better. Feedback isn't about surprising someone, so the sooner you do it, the more they will be expecting it.


2. Ask for permission


Giving a simple heads up makes a difference.

Say "hey, do you have a minute for some feedback?"

This lets a M8 get mentally ready for it, be it positive or negative.


3. Keep it private


Don’t criticise publicly – ever.


4. State what you observed


Don’t beat about the bush.


Feedback should be solution-focussed, crystal clear, and to the point.

Where possible, use ‘I statements’, specific examples and avoid being judgmental.

Focus on a worker’s behaviours (what they do) rather than on their personality traits (what they’re like). Avoid general comments like “your work needs to be improved.”

Use specific examples like:

“I have noticed your tools lying out and not packed away at the end of your shift”.


5. Explain the impact


Point out the direct impact that resulted from this behaviour.

Be specific and use ‘I statements’, for example :

“I am aware that the night shift team were annoyed as they had to spend time looking for the right tools”.


6. Pause


After sharing your thoughts – stop.

Give the recipient of your feedback a chance to think through what you said and respond to it.


7. Suggest next steps


Give one or two suggestions that they can do in the future to change this behaviour.

Remember, give suggestions not directions.


Tip: Keep your language and tone in check

Try to avoid negative emotions such as anger, sarcasm or disappointment. A more concerned neutral tone will show that you believe the problem should be taken seriously.

Tip: It’s not all bad - recognise the positives

We all thrive on positive feedback. Don’t assume workers know when they are performing well. Learn more about giving meaningful recognition.


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GET TO KNOW YOUR WORKM8TES

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TAKE THE WORKER WELLBEING SURVEY
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